SRapallo. Ipad drawing. Any summer day in Faro, Portugal in 2016.

Summer is coming again. The changing seasons is a festival of colors that we gain every year. For free!
O verão está chegando. A mudança das estaçōes é um festival de cores que ganhamos de presente todos os anos. E é de graça.

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image_546081658709937SRapallo, Ipad drawing, Faro, Portugal, 2016.

Andy Warhol´s T-shirt Portuguese Edition

SRapallo, Typographia T- shirt store, Lisbon, PT

Lisbon: Mercado da Ribeira – Time Out

Last week we went to Lisbon to celebrate my B-day and even though we didn´t have dinner at the Ribeira Market, we had to check out this new place, at least for us, because last time we went to Lisbon was 2016, for the Adele Concert.

The Ribeira Market immediately reminded us of Mercado de San Miguel, in Madrid, but bigger, much bigger and more sophisticated, with chefs signing some of their creations specially for the Ribeira Market. I also checked out the store A Vida Portuguesa, and a Time Out super bar with a DJ that started playing music after 10:30pm… and some dancers exhibited their talent in front of the DJs. We tried some dancing too because it was a Brazilian song… We have to honor the mother country, right?

The magazine Time Out ventured out and won the concession of the Ribeira Market which became, as the magazine often refers to other cool places, an in-spot.

The space’s concept is simple: become the first magazine in the world that you can read, eat and drink. How do you make this possible? By inviting the spots that were highly recommended by its editorial staff to become a part of its physical space. This means you’ll find about 34 spaces in the Ribeira Market, each with a different concept but most of them with an identical principle – to promote Portuguese products and to work with the spaces within the market itself.

The market has a very special offer: top chef stands at low-cost prices (not really), where you can indulge in dishes signed by: Alexandre Silva (Bica do Sapato), Miguel Castro e Silva (Largo, DeCastro e DeCastro Elias), Henrique Sá Pessoa (Alma), Marlene Vieira (Avenue), Vítor Claro (Claro), Susana Felicidade (Restaurante Pharmácia, Taberna Ideal and Petiscaria Ideal) and Dieter Koschina (Vila Joya). Right alongside great names from Portuguese cuisine, you’ll also find the recent project Croqueteria, with its traditional croquette which includes, among other bold versions, a cuttlefish ink croquette.

The place that was crowded was serving a plate with asparagus, truffled mashed potatoes, jamon serrano and 64-degree egg… We couldn´t try the dish, but next time… for sure. But here is the recipe if you wanna try. We have this Sous-vide water bath equipament to control the temperature, but you can monitor the temperature yourself with a little bit of patience.

Good luck!!!

The 64-Degree Egg Recipe

  1. Place an egg in a 64 degree C water bath for 45 minutes.
  2. Monitor the temperature constantly – and adjust the water bath by adding hot water if the temperature drops, or scooping out water if it rises. Keeping the lid on helps conserve heat.
  3. Once the eggs are ready, crack the shell and remove it under a water bath to prevent stress to the delicate egg.
  4. Use a spoon to remove the egg
  5. Enjoy atop a sandwich, break it into a salad or pasta!

Back to the Ribeira Market. In the middle you’ll find beverage suggestions, namely Compal, which presents itself in a more handmade format with natural juices only; and Super Bock, that will teach you, with the aid of an interactive device, how to serve your own draft beer.

Besides those already mentioned, there are many other great concepts here, such as: Delta, Vista Alegre, Renova, Sea Me, Café de São Bento, Monte Mar, João Portugal Ramos, Cinco e Meio, Bar da Odete, Esporão, Casa da Ginja, O Prego da Peixaria, Asian Lab, Pizza a Pezzi, Confraria, Honorato, Manteigaria Silva, Arcádia, Conserveira de Lisboa, O Meu Amor é Verde, Folha do Cais, Santini, Nós é Mais Bolos, Garrafeira Nacional. And the terraces: Trincas (The Decadente), Aloma and Azul.

BTW. We went to As Salgadeiras for my birthday dinner…. Bacalhau ao Morro Alto!!!!!!!!!! Super duper delicious!!!!!!!

For more information:
Time Out Mercado da Ribeira
Avenida 24 de Julho
1200 – 481
Lisbon+351 213 460 333

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Eremita de San Frutos (Saint Fructus) – Sepúlveda/Segovia

There are only reminiscing of the church itself. Saint Fructus (Spanish: San Fruitos, Frutos, Fructos) was a Castilian hermit of the eighth century venerated as a saint. Christian tradition states that he had two siblings, named Valentine (Valentín) and Engratia (Engracia). They all lived as hermits on a mountain in the region of Sepúlveda. Engratia should not be confused with the 4th-century Portuguese martyr of the same name.

Born in the 7th century to a noble family of Segovia, Fructus and his two siblings sold their family possessions after their parents’ death and gave the earnings to poor. Wishing to escape from the city and the turbulent times, they established themselves on the rocky terrain near the village of Sepulveda now known as the Hoces del Duratón, where they lived apart from one another in caves that ensured them complete solitude.

Tradition holds that Valentine and Engratia were later martyred around 715 by advancing Moorish forces, and that Fructus died of natural causes in the same year at the age of 73.

Legends

A legend states that some locals, wishing to join Fructus in his retreat to his death, traveled there, only to be pursued by Moorish forces to the very door of Fructus’ hermitage. Fructus attempted to convert the Muslim soldiers, but without success. The legend goes on to state that Fructus drew a line across the earth, asking that the Moorish forces not cross it. When they ignored him and attempted to cross, the earth miraculously opened up to swallow them up, at a crack in the rock now called La Cuchillada. From that point on, the Moors did not bother Fructus.[2]

Veneration

They are venerated as the patron saints of Segovia, where their relics are enshrined and are recognized as saints of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Rome.

Fructus, Valentine and Engratia are commemorated on 25 October by Western Rite Orthodox communities, and in the Roman Catholic Church.

Their relics were conserved in the hermitage of San Frutos from the 8th century to the 11th, when they were translated to Segovia Cathedral. The area of Fructus’ hermitage suffered various political and military vicissitudes; this area was conquered by Fernán González before being annexed by Al-Mansur Ibn Abi Aamir in 984. It fell to Christian control once again in 1011 through the efforts of Sancho García of Castile, and in 1076 was repopulated by Alfonso VI of Castile. By the 1070s, the Benedictines had established a church in honor of Saint Fructus in the area, as well as an adjoining monastery.

On the night of October 24 is celebrated the procession in honor of Fructus known as the Paso de la Hoja (“Turn of the Page”). A sculpture of Fructus rests in a niche in this cathedral. This sculpture has Fructus holding a book; according to local legend, it is the “Book of Life”: when Fructus turns to the last page, the world will end.

Fructus’ feast day is celebrated with music and contests, and devotees also celebrate his feast day at the park of Hoces del Río Duratón, where they accompany a statue of Fructus.

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Santiago de Compostela (El camino) or The Way of St. James

This is my first blog in 2018. My last one was in June 2017. I had my personal journey fighting against cervical cancer last year and I had no energy whatsoever to post anything. Well, I’m still here! But after surgery in July and the beginning of chemo at the end of August, I’ve manage to travel to  Galícia and visited the city of Santiago de Compostela and the surroudings cities, Muxia, Ézaro, Carnota, Corcubión, Muros, Noia and also Finisterre, the last post of pilgrimage. I confess I didn’t do the whole “camino” but, you know, due to the circumstance at that particular moment of my life, I was happy just being there and somehow feeling blessed. Spain is a wonderful country to travel, full of history, wonderful food and spectacular wineries. It’s an energetic country to feel alive and enjoy living!! Something like “La Fiesta” therapy.

I love traveling by car. From Madrid to Santiago de Compostela is like 5.2 hours driving and the sightseeing change completely from the arid weather in Castilla La Mancha to a humid and ultra green meadows in Galicia. And I love eating fresh products from local producers. I specially recommend “O Graneiro de Amelia” (www.ograneirodeamelia.gal) where you can buy grains, species, dry nuts, teas and herbs. The colors, the smell of species and honey…. indescribable!!! And don’t forget to eat the Almond Tart, also a local food tradition.

There are eight main Camino de Santiago pilgrimage routes in Spain:

Camino Frances – the busiest route.
Via de la Plata – the longest Camino.
Camino del Norte – along the sea.
Camino Ingles The English Road – the shortest Camino.
Camino Portugues, (finishes in Santiago de Compostela but starts in Portugal).
Camino Primitivo. the original one.

Even if you don’t do the Camino, visit the city, the Cathedral and also Santa Maria la Real de Sar, a medieval church from XVI Century. From the cathedral’s balcony you can contemplate the beauty of the roofs and the city’s skyline. Unfortunately the frontal cathedral’s facade (The Obradoiro) is being restored and only will be re-opening on 2023. Well, I’ll have to come back somehow!

The Way of St. James (El Camino) was one of the most important Christian pilgrimages during the Middle Ages. Legend holds that St. James’s remains were carried by boat from Jerusalem to northern Spain, where he was buried in what is now the city of Santiago de Compostela. (The name Santiago is the local Galician evolution of Vulgar Latin Sancti Iacobi, “Saint James”.)

The Way can take one of dozens of pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela. Traditionally, as with most pilgrimages, the Way of Saint James began at one’s home and ended at the pilgrimage site. However, a few of the routes are considered main ones. During the Middle Ages, the route was highly travelled. However, the Black Death, the Protestant Reformation, and political unrest in 16th century Europe led to its decline. By the 1980s, only a few pilgrims per year arrived in Santiago.

Most pilgrims carry a document called the credencial, purchased for a few euros from a Spanish tourist agency, a church or parish house on the route, a refugio, their church back home, or outside of Spain through the national St. James organization of that country. The credencial is a pass which gives access to inexpensive, sometimes free, overnight accommodation in refugios along the trail. Also known as the “pilgrim’s passport”, the credencial is stamped with the official St. James stamp of each town or refugio at which the pilgrim has stayed. It provides pilgrims with a record of where they ate or slept, and serves as proof to the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago that the journey was accomplished according to an official route, and thus that the pilgrim qualifies to receive a compostela (certificate of completion of the pilgrimage).

The “Way of St James” is marked by a scallop shell, a symbol of humility that also served practical purposes for pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago. The shell was the right size for gathering water to drink or for eating out of as a makeshift bowl. The pilgrim’s staff is a walking stick used by pilgrims to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela.

Most often the stamp can be obtained in the refugio, cathedral, or local church. If the church is closed, the town hall or office of tourism can provide a stamp, as can nearby youth hostels or private St. James addresses. Many of the small restaurants and cafes along the Camino also provide stamps. Outside Spain, the stamp can be associated with something of a ceremony, where the stamper and the pilgrim can share information. As the pilgrimage approaches Santiago, many of the stamps in small towns are self-service due to the greater number of pilgrims, while in the larger towns there are several options to obtain the stamp.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_de_Compostela

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Sublime Terrine

Sublime Terrine

 

I just love terrine and pates and… well, French Cuisine.  Last weekend we went to visit the Monastery of Uclés, located 98km from Madrid and I bought a bottle of Vermut by a local producer. Well, it was the excellent excuse to prepare another terrine. This time I put pork, veal and cow meat. Wrapped in bacon and also pistachios, mushrooms, rose pepper and  truffles.

We put in this terrine porcelain we bought on my last trip to Paris, at Au Bain Marie shop.  If you want to try it, below you can find the recipe.2 tbsp brandy, optional – Vermut in my case

SRapallo, Terrine, watercolor on Archer, 2017.
SRapallo, Terrine, watercolor on Archer, 2017.
    • 12 rashers bacon
    •  100 g pack pork mince
    • 100 g pack veal mince
    • 100 g pack cow meat mince
    • 50 g (2oz) pistachios, roughly chopped
    • 50 g mushrooms chopped and seasoned with truffles´s oil
    • Bay leaves to decorate
 Method
  1. In a large bowl let all the meats to macerate for 20-24 hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan) mark 4. Put the 1 or 2 bay leaves in the loaf to decorate.  Use about the bacon to line the inside of a 900g (2lb) loaf, leaving excess hanging over the sides. Mix together the meats and put them on the food processor, but don´t let much time, just to cut in small pieces.
  3. Press the mixture into the loaf tin, leveling the surface. Fold any overhanging bacon over the filling; cover with remaining rashers. Press down again to make sure the surface is smooth. Lightly oil a small sheet of aluminum foil and press on top of the loaf tin. Wrap tin well in a further double layer of foil, then put into a roasting tin.
  4. Half-fill the roasting tin with boiling water from the kettle and carefully transfer to oven. Cook for 1½hr until the terrine feels solid when pressed. Leave to cool.
  5. Serve the terrine warm or at room temperature in slices with toast and salad.

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